Don't share reports with clients, share your data!

When it comes to presenting findings and insight with colleagues and clients, the procedure is usually the same. Create a written summary report, deliver the Powerpoint presentation, field any questions, repeat until everyone is happy.

 

But this approach tends to produce very static uninspiring reports, and presentations that lack interaction. This often necessitates further sessions, if clients or colleagues have questions that can't be directly answered, want additional clarifications, or the data explored in a different way. And the final reports don't always have the life we'd want for them, ending up on a shelf, or buried in a bulging inbox.

 

But what if rather than sharing a static report, you could actually share the whole research project with your clients? If rather than sending a Powerpoint deck, you could send them all of the data, and let them explore it for themselves? That way, if one of the clients is interested in looking at results from a particular demographic group, they can see it themselves, rather than asking for a report to be generated. If another client wants to see all the instances of negative words being used to describe their brand, they can see all the quotes in one click, and in another all the positive words.

 

In many situations, this would seem like an ideal way to engage with clients, but usually it cannot be facilitated. To send clients a copy of all the data in the project, transcripts, nodes, themes and all would be a huge burden for them to process. Researchers would also assume that few clients would be sufficiently versed in qualitative analysis software to be able to navigate the data themselves.

 

But Quirkos takes a different approach, which opens up new possibilities for sharing data with end users. As it is designed to be usable by complete novices at qualitative research, your project file, and the software interface itself can be used as a feedback tool. Send your clients the project data in a Quirkos file, with a copy of the software that runs live from a USB stick. You can even give them an Android tablet with the data on, which they can explore with a touch interface. They can then quickly filter the data however they like, see all the responses you've coded, or even rearrange your themes or nodes in ways that makes sense for them. The research team have collected the data, transcribed and coded it, but clients can get a real sense of the findings, running searches and queries to explore anything of interest to them.

 

And even when you are doing a presentation, while Quirkos will generate visual graphs and overviews of the data to include as static image files in Powerpoint, why not bring up Quirkos itself, and show the data as a live demonstration? You can show how themes are related, run queries for particular demographics segments, and start a really interactive discussion about the data, where you can field answers to queries in real time, generating easy to understand graphical displays on the fly. Finally, you can generate those static PDF or Word reports to share and cement your insights, but they will have come as a the result of the discussion and exploration of the project you did as collaborators.

 

Isn't it time you stopped sharing dry reports, and started sharing answers?

 

Quirkos launch workshop

This week we had our official launch event for Quirkos, a workshop at the Institute of Education in London, but hosted by the University of Surrey CAQDAS network.

It was a great event, with tea and cake, and more than 30 people turning up on the day. Participants learnt about the philosophy behind Quirkos, how it fits in with the other qualitative analysis software packages on the market, and got an extensive interactive workshop session. We got some great feedback from participants, who seemed really enthusiastic about the potential for using Quirkos in their research, and lots of new ideas to take the project forward.

It is always invaluable to get feedback from new users, and the questions and suggestions raised will all be taken to heart in the next few months, helping us to improve our training and support, and add new features to make working with qualitative data even easier. Inevitably we also found a bug with creating new sources in the Mac version, and we are hoping to have a fix for this by the end of next week.

It was also a good time for reflection, with Quirkos now having been available for two months now. Interest has been amazing, and we already have customers from the UK, USA, Canada, and Australia, and have exceeded the number of licences we expected to sell at this stage! However, this is just the beginning, and in the new year Quirkos will be growing, allowing us to offer a better service and more rapid improvements. We are moving into new offices, staying in Edinburgh, but moving down to the port of Leith, right on the sea front. We will also bring on new staff to focus on the commercial and market research sectors, and help us be better focused for users with different needs.

It's also interesting how enthusiastic people have been about the participatory opportunities which they can envisage using Quirkos, and this is going to be a major focus for us. We are going to start some open-data community projects in the new year, that will provide some great examples of how Quirkos can help participants get engaged with research.

Keep watching this space in the new year for more information about our move, and to introduce the new faces who will be joining Quirkos HQ!

Is qualitative data analysis fracturing?

Having been to several international conferences on qualitative research recently, there has been a lot of discussion about the future of qualitative research, and the changes happening in the discipline and society as a whole. A lot of people have been saying that acceptance for qualitative research is growing in general: not only are there a large number of well-established specialist journals, but mainstream publications are accepting more papers based on qualitative approaches.


At the same time, there are more students in the UK at all levels, but especially starting Masters and PhD studies as I’ve noted before. While some of these students will focus solely on qualitative methods, many more will adopt mixed methods approaches, and want to integrate a smaller amount of qualitative data. Thus there is a strong need, especially at the Masters by research level, for software that’s quicker to learn, and can be well integrated into the rest of a project.


There is also the increasing necessity for academic researchers to demonstrate impact for their research, especially as part of the REF. There are challenges involved with doing this with qualitative research, especially summarising large bodies of data, and making them accessible for the general public or for targeted end users such as policy makers or clinicians. Quirkos has been designed to create graphical outputs for these situations, as well as interactive reports that end-users can explore in their own time.


But another common theme has emerged is the possibility of the qualitative field fracturing as it grows. It seems that there are at least three distinct user groups emerging: firstly there are the traditional users of in-depth qualitative research, the general focus of CAQDAS software. They are experts in the field, are experienced with a particular software package, and run projects collecting data with a variety of methods, such as ethnography, interviews, focus groups and document review.


Recently there has been increased interest in text analytics: the application of ‘big data’ to quantify qualitative sources of data. This is especially popular in social media, looking at millions of Tweets, texts, Facebook posts, or blogs on a particular topic. While commonly used in market research, there are also applications in social and political analysis, for example looking at thousands of newspaper articles for portrayal of social trends. This ‘bid data’ quantitative approach has never been a focus of Quirkos’ approach, although there are many tools out there that work in this way.
Finally, there is increasing interest in qualitative analysis from more mainstream users, people who want to do small qualitative research projects as part of their own organisation or business. Increasingly, people working in public sector organisations, HR or legal have text documents they need to manage and gain a deep understanding of.
Increasingly it seems that a one-size-fits-all solution to training and software for qualitative data analysis is not going to be viable. It may even be the case that different factions of approaches and outcomes will emerge. In some ways this may not be too dissimilar to the different methodologies already used within academic research (ie grounded / emergent / framework analysis), but the numbers of ‘researchers’ and the variety of paradigms and fields of inquiry looks to be increasing rapidly.


These are definitely interesting times to be working in qualitative research and qualitative data analysis. My only hope is that if such ‘splintering’ does occur, we keep learning from each other, and we keep challenging ourselves by exposure to alternative ways of working.