Quirkos vs Nvivo: Differences and Similarities

quirkos vs nvivoI’m often asked ‘How does Quirkos compare to Nvivo?’. Nvivo is by far the largest player in the qualitative software field, and is the product most researchers are familiar with. So when looking at the alternatives like Quirkos (but also Dedoose, ATLAS.ti, MAXQDA, Transana and many others) people want to know what’s different!

 

In a nutshell, Quirkos has far fewer features than Nvivo, but wraps them up in an easier to use package. So Quirkos does not have support for integrated multimedia, Twitter analysis, quantitative analysis, memos, or hypothesis mapping and a dozen other features. For large projects with thousands of sources, those using multimedia data or requiring powerful statistical analysis, the Pro and Plus versions of Nvivo will be much more suitable.


Our focus with Quirkos has been on providing simple tools for exploring qualitative data that are flexible and easier to use. This means that people can get up and running quicker in Quirkos, and we hear that a lot of people who are turned off by the intimidating interface in Nvivo find Quirkos easer to understand. But the basics of coding and analysing qualitative data are the same.


In Quirkos, you can create and group themes (called Nodes in Nvivo), and use drag and drop to attach sections of text to them. You can perform code and retrieve functions by double clicking on the theme to see text coded to that node. And you can also generate reports of your coded data, with lots of details about your project.


Like Nvivo, we can also handle all the common text formats, such as PDFs, Word files, plain text files, and the ability to copy and paste from any other source like web pages. Quirkos also has tools to import survey data, which is not something supported in the basic version of Nvivo.


While Quirkos doesn’t have ‘matrix coding’ in the same way as Nvivo, we do have side-by-side comparison views, where you can use any demographic or quantitative data about your sources to do powerful sub-set analysis. A lot of people find this more interactive, and we try and minimise the steps and clicks between you and your data.


Although Quirkos doesn’t really have any dedicated tools for quantitative analysis, our spreadsheet export allows you to bring data into Excel, SPSS or R where you have much more control over the statistical models you can run than Nvivo or other mixed-methods tools allow.

 

However, there are also features in Quirkos that Nvivo doesn’t have at the moment. The most popular of these is the Word export function. This creates a standard Word file of your complete transcripts, with your coding shown as color coded highlights. It’s just like using pen and highlighter, but you can print, edit and share with anyone who can open a Word file.


Quirkos also has a constant save feature, unlike Nvivo which has to be set up to save over a certain time period. This means that even in a crash you don’t loose any work, something I know people have had problems with in Nvivo.


Another important differential for some people is that that Quirkos is the same on Windows and Mac. With Nvivo, the Windows and Mac versions have different interfaces, features and file formats. This makes it very difficult to switch between the versions, or collaborate with people on a different platform. We also never charge for our training sessions, and all our online support materials are free to download on our website


And we didn’t mention the thing people love most about Quirkos – the clear visual interface! With your themes represented as colourful, dynamic bubbles, you are always hooked into your data, and have the flexibility to play, explore and drill down into the data.


Of course, it’s best to get some impartial comparisons as well, so you can get reviews from the University of Surrey CAQDAS network here: https://www.surrey.ac.uk/sociology/research/researchcentres/caqdas/support/choosing/


But the best way to decide is for yourself, since your style of working and learning, and what you want to do with the software will always be different. Quirkos won’t always be the best fit for you, and for a lot of people sticking with Nvivo will provide an easier path. And for new users, learning the basics of qualitative analysis in Quirkos will be a great first step, and make transitioning to a more complex package like Nvivo easier in the future. But download our free trial (ours lasts for a whole month, not just 14 days!) and let us know if you have any questions!

 

How Quirkos can change the way you look at your qualitative data

Quirkos qualitative software seeing data

We always get a lot of inquiries in December from departments and projects who are thinking of spending some left-over money at the end of the financial year on a few Quirkos licences. A great early Christmas present for yourself the team! It’s also a good long term investment, since our licences don’t expire and can be used year after year. They are transferable to new computers, and we’ve committed to provide free updates for the current version. We don’t want the situation where different teams are using different versions, and so can’t share projects and data. Our licences are often a fraction of the cost of other qualitative software packages, but for the above reasons we think that we offer much more value than just the comparative sticker price.

 

But since Quirkos also has a different ethos (accessibility) and some unique features, it also helps you approach your qualitative research data in a different way to other software. In the two short years that Quirkos has been available, it’s become used by more than 100 universities across the world, as well as market research firms and public sector organisations. That has given me a lot of feedback that helps us improve the software, but also a sense of what things people love the most about it. So following is the list of things I hear most about the software in workshops and e-mails.

 

It’s much more visual and colourful

quirkos qualitative coding bubbles

Experienced researchers who have used other software are immediately struck by how colourful and visual the Quirkos approach is. The interface shows growing bubbles that dynamically show the coding in each theme (or node), and colours all over the screen. For many, the Quirkos design allows people to think in colours, spatially, and in layers, improving the amount of information they can digest and work with. Since the whole screen is a live window into the data, there is less need to generate separate reports, and coding and reviewing is a constant (and addictive) feedback process.


This doesn’t appeal to everyone, so we still have a more traditional ‘tree’ list structure for the themes which users can switch between at any time.

 

 

I can get started with my project quicker


We designed Quirkos so it could be learnt in 20 minutes for use in participatory analysis, so the learning curve is much lower than other qualitative software. Some packages can be intimidating to the first-time user, and often have 2 day training courses. All the training and support materials for Quirkos are available for free on our website, without registration. We increasingly hear that students want self-taught options, which we provide in many different formats. This means that not only can you start using Quirkos quickly, setting up and putting data into a new project is a lot quicker as well, making Quirkos useful for smaller qualitative projects which might just have a few sources.

 

 

I’m kept closer to my data

qualitative software comparison view


It’s not just the live growing bubbles that mean researchers can see themes evolve in their analysis, there are a suite of visualisations that let you quickly explore and play with the data. The cluster views generate instant Venn diagrams of connection and co-occurrences between themes, and the query views show side-by-side comparisons for any groups of your data you want to compare and contrast. Our mantra has been to make sure that no output is more than one click away, and this keeps users close to their data, not hidden away behind long lists and sub-menus.

 

 

It’s easier to share with others

qualitative word export


Quirkos provides some unique options that make showing your coded qualitative data to other people easier and more accessible. The favourite feature is the Word export, which creates a standard Word document of your coded transcripts, with all the coding shown as colour coded comments and highlights. Anyone with a word processor can see the complete annotated data, and print it out to read away from the computer.


If you need a detailed summary, the reports can be created as an interactive webpage, or a PDF which anyone can open. For advanced users you can also export your data as a standard spreadsheet CSV file, or get deep into the standard SQLite database using any tool (such as http://sqlitebrowser.org/) or even a browser extension.

 

 

I couldn’t get to grips with other qualitative software

quirkos spreadsheet comparison


It is very common for researchers to come along to our workshops having been to training for other qualitative analysis software, and saying they just ‘didn’t get it’ before. While very powerful, other tools can be intimidating, and unless you are using them on a regular basis, difficult to remember all the operations. We love how people can just come back to Quirkos after 6 months and get going again.


We also see a lot of people who tried other specialist qualitative software and found it didn’t fit for them. A lot of researchers go back to paper and highlighters, or even use Word or Excel, but get excited by how intuitive Quirkos makes the analysis process.

 

 

Just the basics, but everything you need


I always try and be honest in my workshops and list the limitations of Quirkos. It can’t work with multimedia data, can’t provide quantitative statistical analysis, and has limited memo functionality at the moment. But I am always surprised at how the benefits outweigh the limitations for most people: a huge majority of qualitative researchers only work with text data, and share my belief that if quantiatitve statistics are needed, they should be done in dedicated software. The idea has always been to focus on making the core actions that researchers do all the time (coding, searching, developing frameworks and exploring data) and make them as smooth and quick as possible.

 


If you have comments of your own, good or bad, we love to hear them, it’s what keeps us focused on the diverse needs of qualitative researchers.


Get in touch and we can help explain the different licence options, including ‘seat’ based licences for departments or teams, as well as the static licences which can be purchased immediately through our website. There are also discounts for buying more than 3 licences, for different sectors, and developing countries.


Of course, we can also provide formal quotes, invoices and respond to purchase orders as your institution requires. We know that some departments take time to get things through finances, and so we can always provide extensions to the trial until the orders come through – we never want to see researchers unable to get at their data and continue their research!


So if you are thinking about buying a licence for Quirkos, you can download the full version to try for free for one month, and ask us any questions by email (sales@quirkos.com), Skype ‘quirkos’ or a good old 9-to-5 phone call on (+44) 0131 555 3736. We are here for qualitative researchers of all (coding) stripes and spots (bubbles)!

 

Reflections on qualitative software from KWALON 2016

rotterdam centraal station

Last week saw a wonderful conference held by the the Dutch network for qualitative research KWALON, based at the Erasmus University, Rotterdam. The theme was no less than the future of Qualitative Data Analysis (QDA) software.

 

Chair Jeanine Evers opened the session by outlining 8 important themes the group had identified on qualitative analysis software.

 

The first was the challenge of adding features to software that is requested by users or present in competitors software, without breaking the underlying design of the software. Quirkos really connects to this theme, because we have always tried to have a very simple tool-set, based on a philosophy that the software should be very easy to use. While we obviously take heed of suggestions made by our users, we actually have a comprehensive and limited set of features which we have always planned to introduce, and will continue delivering these over the next few years.

 

However, it is not the intention of Quirkos to become a large software package with lots of features, something Jeanine described as a ‘obese software’ that needs to be put on a diet. It was noted that many software providers have released ‘lite’ versions of their software, and another discussion point was if this fragmented approach can benefit universities and users.

 

User friendliness was another theme of the session, and by keeping Quirkos simple we hope to always have this at the fore of our design philosophy. In my talk (you can now get the slides here) I discussed these themes as mostly being about improving accessibility. To this end, we have tried to make Quirkos not just easier to use, but also to teach and own, with permanent licences and discounts for researchers from  countries that can’t usually afford this type of software. For us, the long-term goal is not just increasing the number of people that use software for qualitative analysis, but the number that are able to take up qualitative research in general.

 

There was also some good discussion at the end of our talk about the risks of making software easy to use: especially that it also makes it easy to use badly. As we’ve discussed many times on this blog, software in general can make it very satisfying to code, and this can appear to be more productive than stepping back and thinking about themes or a undertaking deep readings of the data. These problems can apply to all software packages, so it is important that students and educators work together to learn about the whole analysis procedure, and what part CAQDAS can play.

 

Comments also touched on how memo making is a critical part of a good iterative and reflexive qualitative analysis process: which at the moment Quirkos doesn’t forefront (see for example how F4analyse and a future version of Cassandre will operate). Although it is possible to record memos by typing in a source, which gives you the ability to tag and code your memos, as well as writing notes as source properties, this is currently not highlighted enough and we plan on revamping the memo features in a future update.

 


The final theme of the conference, and a major push, was to promote a standard way to exchange software between qualitative software. At the moment it is very difficult for users to move their coded data from one software package to the other. Although most major packages provide options to export their data to other formats (such as spreadsheet CSV data like Quirkos), there is currently no single standard for how should be formatted, so it is very difficult to bring this data – complete with themes and coding - into another package.

 

There was strong support from the software developers to develop and support such a standard, as well as discussions about existing initiatives such as CATA-XML and QuDEx.


This is very important: but not just for users of different of qualitative analysis software, who want to be able to collaborate with universities and colleagues who use different packages. It’s also important for archival purposes, so that qualitative coded data can be universally shared and stored for secondary analysis, and to make it easier for data to be brought in for analysis from the huge number of digital sources in the digital humanities, such as history, journalism, and social media. Such a standard could also be important for formatting data so that machine learning and natural language processing can automate some of the simpler analysis processes on very large ‘big-data’ datasets.


So there is a lot to be done, but a lot of interest in the area in the next few years, with major and minor players all taking different approaches, and seeking common ground. Quirkos is honoured to be a small part of this, and will do whatever we can to improve the world of qualitative analysis for this and the next generation of researchers.

 

 

Quirkos for Linux!

quirkos loves linux

 

We are excited to announce official Quirkos support for Linux! This is something we have been working on for some time, and have been really encouraged by user demand to support this Free and Open Source (FOSS) platform. Quirkos on Linux is identical to the Windows and Mac versions, with the same graphical interface, feature set and file format, so there are no issues working across platforms.


Currently we are only offering a script based installer, which can be downloaded from the main download page. In the future we may try and offer some packaged based deb or rpm downloads, but for the moment there are two practical reasons this is not feasible. First, it is much easier for us to provide one installer that should work on all distributions, regardless of what package manager is utilised. Secondly, Quirkos is build using the latest version of Qt (5.5) which is not yet supported in most stable distributions yet. This would either lead to dependency hell, or users having to install Qt5.5 libraries manually (which actually take up a lot of space, and are themselves based around a script based installer). However, we will revisit this in the future if there is sufficient demand.

 

Most dependencies can be solved by installing qt5 from your repository, although most KDE desktops will already have many of the required packages.

 

Once downloaded, you must make the installer file executable. There are two ways to do this, either by running “chmod +x  quirkos-1.3-linux-installer.run” from the shell in the directory containing the installer, or an alternative GUI based method in Gnome is to right click on the file in the Nautilus file browser, select the properties tab, and then tick the 'Allow executing file as program' box.


Once you've done this, either double click on the file, or run in the bash terminal with “./quirkos-1.3-linux-installer.run”. Of course, if you want to install to a system wide folder (such as /opt/bin) you should run the installer with root permissions. By default Quirkos will install in the user's home folder, although this can be changed during the install process. An uninstaller is also created, but all files are contained in the root Quirkos folder, so deleting the folder will remove everything from your system. After installing, a shortcut will be created on the desktop (on Ubuntu systems) which can be used to run Quirkos, or dragging the icon to the Unity side-bar will keep the launcher in an accessible place. Otherwise, run the Quirkos.sh file in the Quirkos folder to start the application.


If you are looking for FOSS software for qualitative research, try RQDA, an extension for the versatile R statistical package, an open source alternative to SPSS. There is also Weft QDA, although this doesn't seem to have been updated since 2006. It's worth noting that both have fairly obtuse interfaces, and are not well suited for beginners!


We have tested Quirkos on numerous different systems, but obviously we can't check all iterations. So if you have any problems or issues, PLEASE let us know, this is new ground for us, and indeed is the first 'mainstream' qualitative analysis software to be offered for Linux. In fact, tell us if it all works fine as well – the more we hear people are using Quirkos on Linux, the better!