Starting a qualitative research thesis, and choosing a CAQDAS package

qualitative thesis software

 

For those about to embark on a qualitative Masters or PhD thesis, we salute you!

 

More and more post-graduate students are using qualitative methods in their research projects, or adopting mixed-method data collection and using a small amount of qualitative data which needs to be combined with quantitative data. So this year, how can students decide the best approach for the analysis of their data, and can CAQDAS or QDA software help their studies?

 

First, as far as possible, don’t chose the software, choose the method. Think about what you are trying to research, the best way to get deep data to answer your research questions. The type and amount of data you have will be an important factor. Next, how much existing literature and theory there is around your research area? This will affect whether you will adopt a grounded theory approach, or will be testing or challenging existing theory.

 

Indeed, you may decide that that you don’t need software for your research project. For small projects, especially case studies, you may be more comfortable using printouts of your data, and while reading mark important sections with highlighters and post-it notes. Read Séror (2005) for a comparison of computer vs paper methods. You could also look at the 5 Level QDA, an approach to planning and learning the use of qualitative software so that you develop strategies and tactics that help you make the most of the QDA software.

 

Unfortunately, if you decide you want to use a particular software solution it’s not always as simple as it should be. You will have to eventually make a practical choice based on what software your university has, what support they provide, and what your peers and supervisors use.

 

However, while you are a student, it’s also a good time to experiment and see what works best for you. Not only do all the major qualitative software packages offer a free trial, student licences are hugely discounted against the full versions. This gives you the option to buy a copy for yourself (for a relatively small amount of money).

 

There’s a lot of variety in the different qualitative data analysis software available. The most common one is Nvivo, which your university or department may already have a licence for. This is a very powerful package, but can be intimidating for first-time users. Common alternatives like MAXQDA or Atlas.ti are more user friendly, but also adopt similar spreadsheet-like interfaces. There are also lots of more niche alternatives, for example Transana is unmatched for video analysis, and Dedoose works entirely in the cloud so you can access it from any computer. For a more comprehensive list, check out the Wikipedia list, or the profiles on textanalysis.info

 

Quirkos does a couple of things differently though. First, our student licences don’t expire, and are some of the cheapest around. This means that it doesn’t matter if your PhD takes 3 or 13 years, you will still be able to access your work and data without paying again. And yes, you can keep using your licence into your professional career. It also aims to be the easiest software package to use, and puts visualisations of the data first and foremost in the interface.

 

So give Quirkos a try, but don’t forget about all the other alternatives out there: between them all you will find something that works in the way you want it to and makes your research a little less painful!