Reaching saturation point in qualitative research

  A common question from newcomers to qualitative research is, what’s the right sample size? How many people do I need to have in my project to get a good answer for my research questions? For research based on quantitative data, there is usually a definitive answer: you can decide ahead of time what sample size is needed to gain a significant result for a particular test or method.   This post is hosted by Quirkos, simple and

Tips for managing mixed method and participant data in Quirkos and CAQDAS software

  Even if you are working with pure qualitative data, like interview transcripts, focus groups, diaries, research diaries or ethnography, you will probably also have some categorical data about your respondents. This might include demographic data, your own reflexive notes, context about the interview or circumstances around the data collection. This discrete or even quantitative data can be very useful in organising your data sources

What actually is Grounded Theory? A brief introduction

  “It’s where you make up as you go along!”   For a lot of students, Grounded Theory is used to describe a qualitative analytical method, where you create a coding framework on the fly, from interesting topics that emerge from the data. However, that's not really accurate. There is a lot more to it, and a myriad of different approaches. Basically, grounded theory aims to create a new theory of interpreting the

Merging and splitting themes in qualitative analysis

To merge or to split qualitative codes, that is the question…   One of the most asked questions when designing a qualitative coding structure is ‘How many codes should I have?’. It’s easy to start out a project thinking that just a few themes will cover the research questions, but sooner or later qualitative analysis tends towards ballooning thematic structure, and before you’ve even started you might have a

Using qualitative analysis software to teach critical thought

  It’s a key part of the curriculum for British secondary school and American high school education to teach critical thought and analysis. It’s a vital life skill: the ability to look at who is saying what, and pick apart what is being said. I’ve been thinking about the possible role for qualitative analysis in education, and how qualitative data analysis software in particular could help develop critical analysis skills