Help us welcome Kristin to Quirkos!

So far, Quirkos users have mostly been based in the academic and university based research areas: perhaps not surprising considering where the project grew from. However, from very early on we got a lot of positive feedback from market research companies working with qualitative and text based data, who had many of the same frustrations and issues with qualitative research software that we had in the academic sphere. Indeed, some of the early

New Leith offices for Quirkos

Just in time for the new year, Quirkos is growing!   We now need a bigger office to accomodate new hires, so we've moved to the 'Shore' at Leith, the seafront of Edinburgh. We've now got space to grow further, and to entertain visitors, all within walking distance of the sea and a short trip from the centre of Edinburgh. There are many exciting companies around us, and we are happy to be in such a nice part of town, with a different place

Don't share reports with clients, share your data!

When it comes to presenting findings and insight with colleagues and clients, the procedure is usually the same. Create a written summary report, deliver the Powerpoint presentation, field any questions, repeat until everyone is happy.   But this approach tends to produce very static uninspiring reports, and presentations that lack interaction. This often necessitates further sessions, if clients or colleagues have questions that can't be

Quirkos launch workshop

This week we had our official launch event for Quirkos, a workshop at the Institute of Education in London, but hosted by the University of Surrey CAQDAS network. It was a great event, with tea and cake, and more than 30 people turning up on the day. Participants learnt about the philosophy behind Quirkos, how it fits in with the other qualitative analysis software packages on the market, and got an extensive interactive workshop session. We got

Is qualitative data analysis fracturing?

Having been to several international conferences on qualitative research recently, there has been a lot of discussion about the future of qualitative research, and the changes happening in the discipline and society as a whole. A lot of people have been saying that acceptance for qualitative research is growing in general: not only are there a large number of well-established specialist journals, but mainstream publications are accepting more