Qualitative evidence for SANDS Lothians

qualitative charity research - image by cchana

Charities and third sector organisations are often sitting on lots of very useful qualitative evidence, and I have already written a short blot post article on some common sources of data that can support funding applications, evaluations and impact assessments. We wanted to do a ‘qualitative case study’: to work with one local charity to explore what qualitative evidence they already had, what they could collect, and use Quirkos to help create some reports and impact assessments.

 

SANDS Lothians is an Edinburgh based charity that provides long-term counselling and support for families who have experienced bereavement through the loss of a child near-birth. They approached us after seeing advertisements for one of our local qualitative training workshops.


Director Nicola Welsh takes up the story. “During my first six months in post, I could see there was much evidence to highlight the value of our work but was struggling to pull this together in some order which was presentable to others. Through working with Daniel and Kristin we were able to start to structure what we were looking to highlight and with their help begin to organise our information so it was available to share with others. Quirkos allowed us to pull information from service users, stats and studies to present this in a professional document. They gave us the confidence to ask our users about their experiences and encouraged us to record all the services we offered to allow others at a glance to get a feel for what we provide.”

 

First of all, we discussed what would be most useful to the organisation. Since they were in discussion with major partners about possible funding, an impact assessment would be valuable in this process.

 

They also identified concerns from their users about a specific issue, prescriptions for anti-depressants, and wanted to investigate this further. It was important to identify the audience that SANDS Lothians wanted to reach with this information, in this case, GPs and other health professionals. This set the format of a possible output: a short briefing paper on different types of support that parents experiencing bereavement could be referred to.

 

We started by doing an ‘evidence assessment’ (or evidence audit as this previous blog post article notes), looking for evidence on impact that SANDS Lothians already had. Some of this was quantitative, such as the number of phone calls received on a monthly basis. As they had recently started counting these calls, it was valuable evidence of people using their support and guidance services. In the future they will be able to see trends in the data, such as an increase in demand or seasonal variation that will help them plan better.

 

They already had national reports from NHS Scotland on Infant Mortality, and some data from the local health board. But we quickly identified a need for supportive scientific literature that would help them make a better case for extending their counselling services. One partner had expressed concerns that counselling was ineffective, but we found a number of studies that showed counselling to be beneficial for this kind of bereavement. Finding these journal articles for them helped provide legitimacy to the approach detailed in the impact assessment.

 

In fact, a simple step was to create a list of all the different services that SANDS Lothians provides. This had not been done before, but quickly showed how many different kinds of support were offered, and the diversity of their work. This is also powerful information for potential funders or partners, and useful to be able to present quickly.

 

Finally, we did a mini qualitative research project!

 

A post on their Facebook page asking for people to share experiences about being prescribed antidepressants after bereavement got more than 20 responses. While most of these were very short, they did give us valuable and interesting information: for example, not all people who had been suggested anti-depressants by their GP saw this as negative, and some talked about how these had helped them at a difficult time.

 

SANDS Lothians already had amazing and detailed written testimonials and stories from service users, so I was able to combine the responses from testimonials and comments from the Facebook feed into one Quirkos project, and draw across them all as needed.

 

Using Quirkos to pull out the different responses to anti-depressants showed that there were similar numbers of positive and negative responses, and also highlighted parent’s worries we had not considered, such as the effect of medication if trying to conceive again. This is the power of an qualitative approach: by asking open questions, we got a responses about issues we wouldn’t have asked about in a direct survey.

 

quirkos bubble cluster view

 

When writing up the report, Quirkos made it quick and easy to pull out supportive quotes. As I had previously gone through and coded the text, I could click on the counselling bubble, immediately see relevant comments, and copy and paste them into the report. Now SANDS Lothians also has an organised database of comments on how their counselling services helped clients, which they can draw on at any time.

 

Nicola explains how they have used the research outputs. “The impact assessment and white paper has been extremely valuable to our work. This has been shared with senior NHS Lothian staff regarding possible future partnership working.  I have also shared this information with the Scottish Government following the Bonomy recommendations. The recommendations highlight the need for clear pathways with outside charities who are able to assist bereaved parents. I was able to forward our papers to show our current support and illustrate the position Lothians are in regarding the opportunity to have excellent bereavement care following the loss of a baby. It strengthened the work we do and the testimonials give real evidence of the need for this care. 

 

I have also given our papers out at recent talks with community midwives and charge midwives in West Lothian and Royal Infirmary Edinburgh. Cecilia has attached the papers to grant applications which again strengthens our applications and validates our work.”

 

Most importantly, SANDS Lothians now have a framework to keep collecting data, “We will continue to record all data and update our papers for 2016.  Following our work with Quirkos, we will start to collate case studies which gives real evidence for our work and the experiences of parents.  Our next step would be to look specifically at our counselling service and its value.” 

 

“The work with Quirkos was extremely helpful. In very small charities, it is difficult to always have the skills to be an expert in all areas and find the time to train. We are extremely grateful to Daniel and Kristin who generously volunteered their time to assist us to produce this work. I would highly recommend them to any business or third sector organisation who need assistance in producing qualitative research.  We have gained confidence as a charity from our journey with Quirkos and would most definitely consider working with them again in the future.”

 

It was an incredible and emotional experience to work with Nicola and Cecilia at SANDS Lothians on this small project, and I am so grateful to for them for inviting us in to help them, and sharing so much. If you want any more information about the services they offer, or need to speak to someone about losing a baby through stillbirth, miscarriage or soon after birth, all their contact details are available on their website: http://www.sands-lothians.org.uk .

 

If you want any more information about Quirkos and a qualitative approach, feel free to contact us directly, or there is much more information on our website. Download a free trial, or read more about adopting a qualitative approach.

 

 

Qualitative evidence for evaluations and impact assessments

qualitative evidence for charities

For the last few months we have been working with SANDS Lothians, a local charity offering help and support for families who have lost a baby in miscarriage, stillbirth or soon after birth. They offer amazing services, including counselling, peer discussion groups and advice to health professionals, which can help ease the pain and isolation of a difficult journey.

 

We helped them put together a compilation of qualitative evidence in Quirkos. This has come from a many sources they already have, but putting it together and pulling out some of the key themes means they have a qualitative database they can use for quickly putting together evaluations, reports and impact assessments. Many organisations will have a lot of qualitative data already, and this can easily become really valuable evidence.

 

First, try doing an ‘audit’ for qualitative data you already have. Look though the potential sources listed below (and any other sources you can think of), and find historical evidence you can bring in. Secondly, keep these sources in mind in day-to-day work, and remember to flag them when you see them. If you get a nice e-mail from someone that they liked an event you ran, or a service they use, save it! It’s all evidence, and can help make a convincing case for funders and other supporters in the future.

 

Here are a few potential sources of qualitative feedback (and even quantitative data) you can bring together as evidence for evaluations and future work:

 

 

1.  Feedback from service users:

Feedback from e-mails is probably the easiest to pull together, as it is already typed up. Whenever someone complements your services, thank them and store the comments as feedback for another day. It is easy to build up a virtual ‘guest-book’ in this way, and soon you will have dozens of supportive comments that you can use to show the difference your organisation makes. Even when you get phone calls, try and make notes of important things that people say. It’s not just positive comments too, note suggestions and if people say there is something missing  – this can be evidence to funders that you need extra resources.

You can also specifically ask for stories from users you know well, these can form case studies to base a report around. If you have a specific project in mind, you can do a quick survey. Ask former users to share their experience on an issue, either by contacting people directly, or asking for comments through social media. By collating these responses, you can get quick support for the direction of a project or new service.

 


2. Social media

Comments and messages of support from your Facebook friends, Twitter followers, and pictures of people running marathons for you on Instagram are all evidence of support for the work you do. Pull out the nice messages, and don’t forget, the number of followers and likes you have are evidence of your impact and reach.

 


3. Local (and international) news

A lot of charities are good at running activities that end up in the local news, so keep clippings as evidence of the impact of your events, and the exposure you get. Funders like to work with organisations that are visible, so collect and collate these. There may also be news stories talking about problems in the community that are related to issues you work on, these can show the importance of the work you do.

 


4. Reports from local authority and national organisations

Keep an eye out for reports from local council meetings and public sector organisations that might be relevant to your charity. If there are discussions on an area you work on, it is another source of evidence about the need for your interventions.


There may also be national organisations or local partners that work in similar areas – again they are likely to write reports highlighting the significance of your area, often with great statistics and links to other evidence. Share and collaborate evidence, and together the impact will be stronger!

 

5. Academic evidence

One of the most powerful ways you can add legitimacy to your impact assessment or funding applications is by linking to research on the importance of the problems you are tackling, or the potential benefits of your style of intervention. A quick search in Google Scholar (scholar.google.com) for keywords like ‘obesity’ ‘intervention’ can find dozens of articles that might be relevant. The journal articles themselves will often be behind ‘paywalls’ that mean you can’t read or download the whole paper. However, the summary is free to read, and probably gives you enough information to support your argument one way or another. Just link to the paper, and refer to it as (‘Author’s surname’, ‘Year of Publication’) for example (Turner 2013).

 

It might also be worth seeking out a relationship with a friendly academic at a local university. Look through Google (or ask through your networks) for someone that works in your area, and contact them to ask for help. Researchers have their own impact obligations, so are sometimes interested in partnering with local charities to ensure their research is used more widely. It can be a mutually beneficial relationship…

 

 

 

Hopefully these examples will help you think through all the different things you already have around you that can be turned into qualitative evidence, and some things you can seek out. We will have more blog posts on our work with local charities soon, and how you can use Quirkos to collate and analyse this qualitative evidence.

 

 

Announcing Pricing for Quirkos

At the moment, (touch wood!) everything is in place for a launch next week, which is a really exciting place to be after many years of effort. From that day, anyone can download Quirkos, try it free for a month, and then buy a licence if it helps them in their work. We've set up the infrastructure so that people can either place purchase orders through their finance department, or make a direct sale through the website by credit or debit card. We can then provide a licence code immediately, and users can unlock Quirkos and use it without any time limit. We don’t want to tie people into contracts or recurring payments; the licence will not expire, and will entitle you to any future updates for that version.

 

The interest we’ve had from users over the past few months has been overwhelming, and we want to have a flexible price structure that is appropriate for lots of different groups. One of my key aims has been to systematically remove the barriers to doing qualitative research – and price is a big hurdle at the moment. I’ve had conversations with so many people who have taken one look at the licence costs of the major qualitative analysis packages, and walked away. To really open up qualitative research for everyone, that needs to change. Our licence will cost roughly half that of our competitors', and we will offer a range of discounts for teams from different backgrounds.

 

First of all, we think Quirkos will be great for students, not just at a PhD level, but also at Masters or Undergraduate level, when there isn’t always the time to spend learning other qualitative research software. So, we are starting the student licence at £35 (roughly €45, US$60), so that people at all stages of learning can get started with qualitative research.

 

For professional academics and people working in the charity sectors, we will heavily discount the licence cost to £180 (€230 / $290). Already we have had beta-testers in the NHS and local government, and users in government institutions or NGOs, can get a licence for just £320 (€400 / $516).

 

Finally, the full licence for commercial use will be £390 (€490 / $620) and comes with our highest level of customer support. Everyone will be able to access regularly updated discussion forums and on-line learning materials, and professional users will also have access to personal e-mail support with a rapid response rate.

 

We really want to encourage a new generation of qualitative researchers and we think we’ve set a fair price that makes access easy, while allowing us to continue to add new features, and provide a strong level of support. Then you can focus on your data and findings, and not just the tools that help you get results.

 

(These are initial indicative prices, subject to change, and currency rates, local sales tax or VAT may lead to some variation in these numbers)