Delivering qualitative market insights with Quirkos

  To build a well-designed, well-thought-out, and ultimately useful product, today’s technology companies must gain a deep understanding of the working mentality of people who will use that product. For Melody Truckload, a Los Angeles tech company focused on app-based freight logistics, this means intense market research and a focus on training sales agents as researchers.   Kody Kinzie, director of Melody’s special

Bing Pulse and data collection for market research

  Judging by the buzz and article sharing going on last week, there was a lot of interest and worry about Microsoft launching their own market research platform. Branded as part of ‘Bing’, their offering, called ‘Pulse’ has actually been around for a while, and is still geared around collecting feedback from live events, especially political discussions. I can see why this move might have a lot of companies

Help us welcome Kristin to Quirkos!

So far, Quirkos users have mostly been based in the academic and university based research areas: perhaps not surprising considering where the project grew from. However, from very early on we got a lot of positive feedback from market research companies working with qualitative and text based data, who had many of the same frustrations and issues with qualitative research software that we had in the academic sphere. Indeed, some of the early

Don't share reports with clients, share your data!

When it comes to presenting findings and insight with colleagues and clients, the procedure is usually the same. Create a written summary report, deliver the Powerpoint presentation, field any questions, repeat until everyone is happy.   But this approach tends to produce very static uninspiring reports, and presentations that lack interaction. This often necessitates further sessions, if clients or colleagues have questions that can't be

Knowing your customers

As consumers, it feels like we are bombarded more than ever with opportunities for providing feedback on products and services. While shopping on-line, or even when browsing BBC News we are asked to complete a short questionnaire; after dealing with a telephone bank there’s the option to complete a quick survey; and at airport security you can rate your experience by hitting a button with either a smiley face or a frowny face.   But

Getting a foot in the door with qualitative research

A quick look at the British Library thesis catalogue suggests that around 800 theses are completed every year in the UK using qualitative methods*. This suggests that 7% of the roughly 10,000 annual British PhDs completed use qualitative methods. There are likely to be many more masters theses, and even undergraduate dissertations that use some qualitative methods, so the student demand for qualitative training is considerable.   Usually,

Paper vs. computer assisted qualitative analysis

I recently read a great paper by Rettie et al. (2008) which, although based on a small sample size, found that only 9% of UK market research organisations doing qualitative research were using software to help with qualitative analysis.   At first this sounds very low, but it holds true with my own limited experiences with market research firms, and also with academic researchers. The first formal training courses I attended on Qualitative