Quantitative vs. qualitative research

So this much is obvious: quantitative research uses numbers and statistics to draw conclusions about large populations. You count something that is countable, and process results across the sample.   Qualitative methods are more elusive: however in general they revolve around collecting data from people about an experience. This could be how they used a service, how they felt about something, and could be verbal or written. But it is

Engaging qualitative research with a quantitative audience.

  The last two blog post articles were based on a talk I was invited to give at ‘Mind the Gap’, a conference organised by MDH RSA at the University of Sheffield. You can find the slides here, but they are not very text heavy, so don’t read well without audio!   The two talks which preceded me, by Professors Glynis Cousin and John Sandars, echoed quite a few of the themes. Professor Cousin spoke persuasively about

How to set up a free online mixed methods survey

It’s quick and easy to set up an on-line survey to collect feedback or research data in a digital format that means you can quickly get straight to analysing the data. Unfortunately, most packages like SurveyMonkey, SurveyGizmo and Kwiksurveys, while all compatible with Quirkos, require a paying subscription before you can actually export any of your data and analyse it.   However, there are two great free platforms we recommend that

Why qualitative research?

There are lies, damn lies, and statistics It’s easy to knock statistics for being misleading, or even misused to support spurious findings. In fact, there seems to be a growing backlash at the automatic way that significance tests in scientific papers are assumed to be the basis for proving findings (an article neatly rebutted here in the aptly named post “Give p a chance!”). However, I think most of the time statistics are