Open and Axial Coding Using Qualitative Software

  Many forms of grounded theory adopt a variant of open, axial and selective coding as their key steps in qualitative analysis. Usually these follow the description in Strauss and Corbin (1990), but others such as Glaser (1978) defined similar procedures using the terms ‘Substantive coding’ and ‘Theoretical coding’. Charmaz (2006/2014) uses the term ‘Initial Coding’ which could be seen as similar to open coding, followed by

Importing structured qualitative data into Quirkos

While most qualitative researchers will use unstructured sources of data for their analysis, there are often times when you need to bring in data from structured interviews or surveys. Quirkos has tools and features that specifically help you manage these types of sources.   When you start a project in Quirkos, there are two options: password protection and structured project. This is a feature that must be toggled when you start a

Analyzing qualitative data tutorial

How do you actually analyse qualitative data? How do you start to digest a rich qualitative data set, and begin to pull together the strands that will show insights from the data?   If you've ever written a book report in high school, some of the basic concepts are the same. You need to create a summary of a much longer piece of work that describes the most important events, characters and their motivations. There will also be recurring

Collaboration, Data Analysis and Ethics

Collaboration is a common feature of modern research life. Researchers may collaborate at every stage from seeking funding to disseminating findings. They might collaborate with other researchers, or managers, supervisors, participants, colleagues from other disciplines – anyone whose input seems likely to be useful, and who is willing to play along.   There has been little information about how to collaborate apart from the

Tips for conducting online interviews and focus groups for qualitative research

  Lockdowns and social distancing due to COVID-19 are currently changing the way that qualitative researchers collect data, and likely to do so for some time. The semi-structured (or unstructured) interview or focus group are two of the most popular qualitative methods, but are usually conducted in face-to-face settings. And while it is possible to move these meetings to virtual video or even telephone based interviews, these come with