Teaching qualitative analysis software with Quirkos

It’s a new academic year, and many professors, lecturers and TAs will be reviewing their course materials and slides for this semester and beyond. Those teaching qualitative methods will also be looking at how to teach qualitative analysis, and wondering about including software as part of that process. While qualitative analysis software is only one small part of the qualitative methods puzzle and journey, it can take a

Announcing Quirkos version 2!

Today we are announcing that a major new version of Quirkos is coming in September! Version 2  will offer big new features that users have requested, including memos, rich text support, new editable reports, an improved interface, and much more.   Memos are a feature that people have been requesting for a while, and we are excited to have this coming in the next version. This allows users to write notes which are attached to specific

10 alternative qualitative methods

At the National Council for Research Methods ‘Research Methods Festival’ last month, Steve Wright (from the University of Lancaster) mentioned in his talk the frustrations he has with students that do the bog-standard ’12 semi-structured interviews’ methodology for their qualitative research projects. This prompted a lot of discussion and empathy over lunch, with many tutors lamenting how students weren’t

Quirkos v1.5.2 is here!

  We are pleased to announce a bug fix release for Quirkos that takes us to version 1.5.2.   This is a fairly minor update, but includes 4 bug fixes people had reported:     • Quirks that got ‘stuck’ and couldn’t be dragged     • An issue with deleting sources that sometimes caused properties to have extra ‘not defined’ responses     • A bug

What is qualitative observation?

  Essentially, observation is a type of, or more likely, a part of ethnography. In ethnography, anthropologists (people who study people) turn their observations of people, cultures and organisations into written field notes (a bit like a research diary). While some of this may be reflexive (the participants own thoughts and feelings) most focuses on the activities and interactions of the people being studied.   There are broadly two