Word clouds and word frequency analysis in qualitative data

  What’s this blog post about? Well, it’s visualised in the graphic above!   In the latest update for Quirkos, we have added a new and much requested feature, word clouds! I'm sure you've used these pretty tools before, they show a random display of all the words in a source of text, where the size of each word is proportional to the number of times it has been counted in the text. There are several free online tools that

Quirkos v1.5 is here

  We are happy to announce the immediate availability of Quirkos version 1.5! As always, this update is a free upgrade for everyone who has ever brought a licence of Quirkos, so download now and enjoy the new features and improvements.   Here’s a summary of the main improvements in this release:   Project Merge You can now bring together multiple projects in Quirkos, merge sources, Quirks and coding from many authors at

An introduction to Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

  Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) is an increasingly popular approach to qualitative inquiry and essentially an attempt to understand how participants experience and make meaning of their world. Although not to be confused with the now ubiquitous style of beer with the same initials (India Pale Ale), Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis is similarly accused of being too frequently and imperfectly brewed (Hefferon and

Archaeologies of coding qualitative data

  In the last blog post I referenced a workshop session at the International Conference of Qualitative Inquiry entitled the ‘Archaeology of Coding’. Personally I interpreted archaeology of qualitative analysis as being a process of revisiting and examining an older project. Much of the interpretation in the conference panel was around revisiting and iterating coding within a single analytical attempt, and this is very

Against Entomologies of Qualitative Coding

I was recently privileged to chair a session at ICQI 2017 entitled “The Archaeology of Coding”. It had a fantastic panel of speakers, including Charles Vanover, Paul Mihas, Kathy Charmaz and Johnny Saldaña all giving their own take on this topic. I’m going to write about my own interpretation of qualitative coding archaeologies in the next blog post, but for now I wanted to cover an important common issue that all the